[The Miriam Hopkins Blogathon] Design for Living: Part Four-Not Your Average Rom Com Heroine

Not Your Average Rom Com Heroine

Venetia

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Gilda Farrell is the unicorn of women movie characters: she’s unconventional without being (the cliched Hollywood-version of) a free spirit. Sure, most of us have heard that such a thing exists, without ever believing it could be true.

Trust me, dears. Gilda is the real deal.

She’s whip-smart, witty, straightforward, and determined to make the choices that are best for her. Even, as it turns out, when they are considered brazen or unbecoming of a “nice” woman. She starts with the awareness that women suffer from an almost unrelenting series of double standards:

Gilda's Speech

Gilda’s Speech in Design for Living (1933)

 From there, she decides to take action. This is why Gilda is so exceptional, why her decision to live romantically with two men is so fucking revolutionary. It is, also, why she is not a free-spirit:

To label her as such denies Gilda her self-governance, her experience, her bravery, and her brains.

Without them, she’d be just another silver screen beauty feigning eccentricity before accepting her fate as the good wife of an exceptionally handsome man.

Thank God for Gilda.

Her supposed immorality not only goes unpunished, but she gets to keep her self-respect, Gary Cooper, and Fredric March.

That’s pretty damn nifty.

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♣Venetia is our Feminism correspondent. She loves equality, swearing, and huge cups of coffee.

 The Miriam Hopkins Blogathon

The Miriam Hopkins Blogathon

The Miriam Hopkins Blogathon

Font and Frock: A Brief History

2010:

Font and Frock came into the world with passionate intentions. Several months later, it died the way it was born: as a double-sided, hard copy ‘zine. The hand-assembled publication had two covers, two themes, and one goal: to present arts-related topics in a variety of intelligent, witty, and distinct ways. The front half (Font) was brim-full with original poetry, short stories, and literary essays. The back-end (Frock) covered classic film, pop culture, and fashion.

Contributors came from across the United States and Canada. It was a true labor of love, and one I had every intention of fostering to success.

Then I got engaged.

Between working full-time, moving to a new flat, and planning a wedding, something had to give. That something was, of course, Font and Frock. By the time I settled into newly married bliss, my not-so-little publication was a thing of the past. In the  meantime, other creative pursuits had muscled their way into my heart and head.

My fondness for the project remained.

I always knew that, one day, I’d return to Font and Frock. One day, when I had more time. One day, when things weren’t so hectic. One day, after I had accomplished other creative goals.

2015:

That day is almost here.

The new Font and Frock is a bit different from its predecessor. The vessel of expression has changed from a ‘zine to a blog (for now, at least). She’s also half the girl she used to be, content-wise. A Small Press Life took over where Font left off: it is home to my obsession with obscure books, dead writers, and all things old-timey literature related. This blog, then, will focus on what remains: (classic) films, fashion, flash fiction, and feminism.

I hope you’ll hang around to see her come back to life.

❤ Maedez